Harvey – Baltimore Clipper

This Baltimore Clipper from a kit named Harvey is being modified and built by Martin Jelsema

This Baltimore Clipper from a kit named Harvey is being modified and built by Martin Jelsema

Modeler’s Name: Martin Jelsema
Period: Early 19th Century
Scale: 1:50
Type of Model: Modified kit – plank on frame
Build Time: 250 hrs so far

Build Materials:
This modified plank on bulkhead kit by Artisania Latina contains several wood types and will be complemented by brass and rigging cord of various sizes. Cherry wood was substituted for the walnut strips provided by the manufacturer. The entire deck layout will adhere to actual ship plans instead of the inaccurate deck plan supplied.

Ship’s Story:
There was no ship named Harvey from the time or the design of this model. Therefore, much research from several books will make it an authentic Baltimore Clipper fitted as a privateer in service of the U.S. during the War of 1812. The ship will be rigged as a topsail schooner.

Modeler’s Bio:
This is Martin Jelsema’s fourth build since “retiring” as a marketing consultant four years ago. As a teenager he built the wooden schooner model of the Bluenose. He collected tools for the next 50 years in anticipation of renewing the hobby while persuing a career in advertising and market consulting.

CSS Alabama

CSS Alabama

Martin Jelsema modified the CSS Alabama from the Mamoli kit

Modeler’s Name: Martin Jelsema

Period: Civil War
Scale: 1:120
Type of Model: Modified kit – plank on frame
Build Time: 700hrs

Build Materials:
This Model is a modified plank on bulkhead Mamoli kit build. Both deck configuration and rigging deviated from the Mamoli plans to follow the details illustrated in the book by Andrew Bowcock, Anatomy of a Confederate Raider. Hull is double planked in basswood and walnut. The “hammocks” on the rails are Q-tips. Completed with wood, cord and metal fittings.

Ship’s Story:
The CSS Alabama was Confederate raider whose mission was to interrupt Union merchant trade during the Civil War. During it’s two years of raiding it captured 63 American merchant ships and one War Ship. It was in port at Cherbourg, France when “called out” by the USS Kearsarge. It was sunk by the Kearsarge. It was discovered by divers and is being raised little by little by the French.

Modeler’s Bio:
This is Martin Jelsema’s third build since “retiring” as a marketing consultant four years ago. As a teenager he built the wooden schooner model of the Bluenose. He collected tools for the next 50 years in anticipation of renewing the hobby while persuing a career in advertising and market consulting.

Charles W. Morgan – Whaler

Vintage kit modified by Martin Jelsema - his second build

Vintage kit modified by Martin Jelsema – his second build

Modeler’s Name: Martin Jelsema
Period: Mid 19the Century
Scale: 1:120
Type of Model: severely modified kit
Build Time: no estimate

Build Materials:
This began as a vintage Scientific Models kit, but aside from the solid hull and deck furnishings, the model was fashioned from the plans of the Model Shipways version of the Morgan. That meant modeling a 1:120 model using plans for a 1:60 scale model – meaning all the masting and rigging had to be scaled at half-size.

Ship’s Story:
Whaler built in 1843. It was active, mostly in the Pacific with many hunts of more than two years. The Morgan still exists! The ship is the only surviving wooden whaling ship from the 19th Century whaling fleet. She was placed on The Register of Historic Places in 1966 as a National Historic Landmark. It is berthed at Mystic Seaport in Connecticut, and was recently restored for the second time.

Modeler’s Bio:
Aside from building a wooden hulled Blue Nose schooner as a teen, Martin did not take up ship modeling until 2009. Martin has spent a career in marketing communications, working for ad agencies, IBM, Information Handling Services and Coors Ceramics, as well as consulting and freelancing the past 30 years

Charles W. Morgan

Charles W. Morgan whaler by Martin Jelsema

Martin Jelsema modified this vintage kit to represent a detailed and relatively accurate rigging plan.

Martin Jelsema took a vintage kit and modified it to better represent the real ship which resides at Mystic Seaport, CN. It’s a solid hull model from the early 1970’s. Other materials include balsa and basswood, fine wire, thread and metal fittings. Rigging was derived from photos and published materials about whaling ship construction, rigging and operation. Martin spent 9-months on this project of which 2-months involved research and drawing plans for the rigging.

The Charles W. Morgan still exists. It is a major fixture at the Mystic Seaport Museum in Connecticut. It is the only surviving American wooden whaling ship. The Morgan was launched in 1841, and during her 80-year career at sea she made 37 voyages, several lasting four or more years while hunting whales from the arctic circle to the south seas.

Period: last half of the 19th-Century
Model length: 16”  Height: 13”
Scale: 1:128