Yacht America

Yacht America - Daniel Siemens scratch-built this ship in a bottle

Yacht America – Daniel Siemens scratch-built this ship in a bottle

Modeler’s Name: Daniel Siemens
Type of Model: scratch build ship in bottle
Build Time: 20 hrs.

Build Materials:
Basswood, toothpicks and cloth

Ship’s Story:
The first winner of the “One Hundred Guinea Cup” later known as the America’s Cup named after the ship. The America sailed by Richard Brown won the cup by 18 minutes. After seeing America sail by, Queen Victoria asked who was second. She was answered, “There is no second, your Majesty.”

Modeler’s Bio:
I do accounting as my day job but love bottling ships when I can find time. I started two years ago after watching the fourth Pirates of the Caribbean movie

Xebec – ship in a bottle

This Xebec in a bottle was scratch-built by Daniel Siemens

This Xebec in a bottle was scratch-built by Daniel Siemens

Modeler’s Name: Daniel Siemens
Period: 1700’s
Type of Model: scratch build ship in bottle
Build Time: 20 hours

Build Materials:
Basswood and toothpicks

Ship’s Story:
Xebecs were Mediterranean ships built in the 1700’s with their triangular lateen sails.

Modeler’s Bio:
I do accounting as my day job but love bottling ships when I can find time. I started two years ago after watching the fourth Pirates of the Caribbean movie.

Sengoku Bune

This ship-in-a-bottle was scratch-built by Daniel Siemens. It is a Japanese merchant ship, the Sengoku Bune

This ship-in-a-bottle was scratch-built by Daniel Siemens. It is a Japanese merchant ship, the Sengoku Bune

Modeler’s Name: Daniel Siemens
Period: 1600’s
Type of Model: scratch build ship in bottle
Build Time: 20 hours

Build Materials:
This ship was built for the challenge. The bottle is a unique Japanese Soda bottle called Ramune. The marble keeps the bottle sealed and is pushed down into the bottle to open it. The build was tricky because not only did the ship have to be split into two pieces to fit through the narrow bottle neck it had to pass over the marble and into the second chamber.

Ship’s Story:
Japanese merchant ship from the early 1600’s. Used mainly to carry rice and sake. It was however occasionally used for warfare such as the raid of Okinawa in 1609.

Modeler’s Bio:
I do accounting as my day job but love bottling ships when I can find time. I started two years ago after watching the fourth Pirates of the Caribbean movie.

Oseberg Viking Ship

Model from a kit of the famed Oseberg Viking Ship by Erik Collett

Model from a kit of the famed Oseberg Viking Ship by Erik Collett

Modeler’s Name: Erik Collette
Period: 815 AD
Scale: 1:50
Type of Model: Kit built
Build Time: 150 hrs.

Build Materials:
Birch plywood, pine and basswood

Ship’s Story:
This ship was a Norwegian Viking ship built in approximately 815 AD. It was used as a burial ship in 834. It was discovered in a burial mound on the Oseberg Farm in Norway in 1904. It has been restored and can be seen today at the Viking ship museum in Oslo. It is 71 feet long with a beam of 15 feet. The construction was unique in that it was klinker built with iron nails and then the planks were tied to the ribs. The mast was approximately 35-40 feet tall. Homespun wool, woven into squares, was used for the sail. The squares were sewn together and the sail was reinforced with strips of leather. There were 15 oar holes on each side. The rudder was an enlarged oar fitted on the aft starboard side. In 2011, a full-scale copy was built to evaluate the design and test the ship’s seaworthiness. The ship is docked in Tonsberg.

Modeler’s Bio:
Erik has been a member of the Rocky Mountain Shipwrights since he was bitten by the modeling bug after visiting the RMS show in 2003. He completed his first model in 2004. Erik hails from Norway, where he was around boats during most of his youth. He attended the Norwegian Naval Academy and sailed on a merchant ship for a year. He came to the USA in 1962, and earned his BSCE and MBA degrees from the University of Denver. He is currently semi-retired.

KDM Dannebrog

KDM Dannebrog, a Danish passenger ship, was built from a kit by Jim Cuscaden

KDM Dannebrog, the Danish Royal yacht, was built from a kit by Jim Cuscaden

Modeler’s name: Jim Cuscaden
Period: 1930’s onward
Type of model:Plank on frame kit
Scale: 1:100

Build materials:
The model was purchased in kit form in Norway in 1979 from Sergal Modelli. It was completed in 1980, but was damaged in a house move and restored in 2015. The model was built using a plank on frame construction using walnut, pine and metal materials.

Ship’s story:
The Dannebrog is named after the Danish flag and provides accommodation for the Queen and Prince Consort on royal trips. Since commissioning in 1932, the vessel has traveled more than 300,000 nautical miles. It is manned by 9 officers and 43 enlisted men.Laid Down : 1931; Launched : 1932; Commissioned: May 1932; Status: In service today. Displacement: 1238 tons; Length: 78 m; Height: 32m

Modeler’s bio:
Jim hales from England and was a member of the British Royal Navy. He has been a Shipwright member for about a year now, and is currently building the HMS Vctory.

Dos Amegos

Dos Amigos, a slave ship from a kit being modeled by Tom Epps

Dos Amigos, a slave ship from a kit being modeled by Tom Epps

Modeler’s Name: Tom Epps
Period: 1830
Scale: 1:53
Type of Model: Plank on bulkhead kit
Build Time: 100 hrs and still building

Build Materials: wood, brass and cord

Ship’s Story:
This ship, a two mast ship built in Baltimore (??) in 1830. it was built for speed which led it to be a Slaver bringing slaves from Africa to Cuba to work in the sugar fields. It has a crew of 34 including the captain, crew men & boys. The ship was captured by the British navy, and became part of the Navy that captured other slave ships. Its name was changed to FAIR ROSAMOND. The ship was taken out of service & sold in 1845

Modeler’s Bio:
Retired from the Telephone Industry after 35 years in Central Office equipment engineering. My first bigger model is the CONSTITUTION built in the late 1960’s.

De Kogge von Bremen

John McGann scratch  built this model plank-for-plank as the original 13th Century De Kogge was found and raised.

John McGann scratch built this model plank-for-plank as the original 13th Century De Kogge was found and raised.

Modeler’s Name: John R. McGann
Period: 1380
Scale: 1=40 19/64″=1′
Type of Model: Scratch build

Build Time: 1,000

Build Materials:
Scratch built of Apple Wood from the plans of the ship developed during its recovery and re-construction. The mast and rigging had not been installed, only a small portion of the decking is shown as the original decking was not recovered. Note: that the deck is athwart the vessel rather than fore and aft.

Ship’s Story:
The Cog or Kogge was a type of vessel used by the Hanseatic League for 500 years. The original ship was built of Baltic Oak in 1380 and swept from the builder’s yard by a flash flood of the Wesser River. Recovered during the dredging of the river in 1962. Now displayed in a museum at Bremerhaven, Germany.

Modeler’s Bio:
Retired Construction Supt. Modeling for 75 years

Charles W. Morgan – Whaler

Vintage kit modified by Martin Jelsema - his second build

Vintage kit modified by Martin Jelsema – his second build

Modeler’s Name: Martin Jelsema
Period: Mid 19the Century
Scale: 1:120
Type of Model: severely modified kit
Build Time: no estimate

Build Materials:
This began as a vintage Scientific Models kit, but aside from the solid hull and deck furnishings, the model was fashioned from the plans of the Model Shipways version of the Morgan. That meant modeling a 1:120 model using plans for a 1:60 scale model – meaning all the masting and rigging had to be scaled at half-size.

Ship’s Story:
Whaler built in 1843. It was active, mostly in the Pacific with many hunts of more than two years. The Morgan still exists! The ship is the only surviving wooden whaling ship from the 19th Century whaling fleet. She was placed on The Register of Historic Places in 1966 as a National Historic Landmark. It is berthed at Mystic Seaport in Connecticut, and was recently restored for the second time.

Modeler’s Bio:
Aside from building a wooden hulled Blue Nose schooner as a teen, Martin did not take up ship modeling until 2009. Martin has spent a career in marketing communications, working for ad agencies, IBM, Information Handling Services and Coors Ceramics, as well as consulting and freelancing the past 30 years