Venetian Galleass

Mark Persichetti built this kit of a Venetian Galleass

Mark Persichetti built and modified this plastic kit of a Venetian Galleass

Modeler’s Name: Mark Persichetti
Period: 1530-1600
Scale: 1:150
Type of Model: plastic kit highly modified
Build Time: not estimated

Build Materials:
This model is built from a kit produced by the Imai Company of Japan about 40 years ago. That kit, while depicting a unique old sail- and oar-driven wooden warship, is made up of molded-plastic parts. All the smooth-plastic surfaces were sanded with coarse-grit paper, to give them a wood-grain appearance. Sails are vacuum-formed thin plastic, sanded in two directions to give them a woven-fabric appearance.

Ship’s Story:
The Galleass type was an expansion of the typical Mediterranean rowed galley, which were long and narrow, propelled by oars in poor wind conditions, and by triangular-shaped ‘lateen’ sails in good winds.
Galleys typically featured battering-ram extensions at their bow, just above the waterline. At the Battle of Lepanto in October 1571, the combined Christian fleets under command of Don Juan of Austria fought against the Turkish fleet commanded by Muezzenade Ali Pasha. The loss of men on both sides was almost equal, but Turkish ship losses were close to 17-to-1 compared to the Christian fleets.

Modeler’s Bio:
Mark has been making models since the 1950s. His first sailing-ship model was a smaller-scale Old Ironsides kit by Revell. Ships have been his favorite modeling subject since then. He has been a member of Rocky Mountain Shipwrights for over ten years.

USN Picket Boat #1

This kit of the USN Picket Boat #1 was modified by Ed Quam, whose distant relative commanded her.

This kit of the USN Picket Boat #1 was modified by Ed Quam, whose distant relative commanded her.

Modeler’s Name: Edward Quam
Period: 1864
Scale: ½” = 1’
Type of Model: plank on frame kit
Build Time: 6 months

Build Materials:
Basswood, Brass, Cast Britania Metal and simulated coal

Ship’s Story:
The boat was commanded by Lt Cushing and crew of 15. Cushing was a washout at the Naval Academy but was given this command because of his brash bravery. The mission was to sink the CSS Albemarle that was protecting the Albemarle Sound pinning down the Union forces. Cushing rammed the Iron Clad, placing the torpedo through a gun port and firing his 12 pound howitzer into it. Cushing was the only one to escape and made it to the Union forces. Declared a hero he was promoted to Lt Commander. The carved figure at the tiller depicts Cushing in full dress uniform.

Modeler’s Bio:
Edward is a retired former Intelligence officer. Born and raised in Colorado educated at CU, DU and Harvard. While stationed in Washington D.C. he was and is a member of the Washington Ship Model Association and a Plank member of the Nautical Research Guild. He has built over 25 models over 60 years of modeling, and has displayed them in various venues around the country.

Red Dragon Chinese Junk

Erik Collett's Red Dragon Chinese Junk from a modified kit

Erik Collett’s Red Dragon Chinese Junk from a modified kit

Modeler’s Name: Erik Collette
Period: last 300 years
Scale: 1:60
Type of Model: Modified kit
Build Time: 150 hrs.

Build Materials:
Boxwood, Sapelli, Walnut, Brass fittings

Ship’s Story:
The Red Dragon was a Chinese junk. These ships have sailed the Far East oceans as far as Africa for over 3000 years. They navigated with the help of the sun and over 2500 greater stars. Navigation became a lot easier when they invented the compass in the 11th Century. Originally, junks were built with a flat bottom and without a keel, a stem and stern posts. Only when they began to sail on the open ocean did it become a necessity to incorporate a keel to strengthen the ship. The junks were always built with watertight bulkheads which the Chinese learned from studying the structure of the bamboo plant. Junks are still built today, the same way as they were built centuries ago.

Modeler’s Bio:
Erik has been a member of the Rocky Mountain Shipwrights since he was bitten by the modeling bug after visiting the RMS show in 2003. He completed his first model in 2004. Erik hails from Norway, where he was around boats during most of his youth. He attended the Norwegian Naval Academy and sailed on a merchant ship for a year. He came to the USA in 1962, and earned his BSCE and MBA degrees from the University of Denver. He is currently semi-retired as an engineering consultant.

Phantom Pilot Boat

The Pilot Boat Phantom is a solid hull kit being constructed by Maxwell Fox

The Pilot Boat Phantom is a solid hull kit being constructed by Maxwell Fox

Modeler’s Name: Maxwell Fox
Period: 1868
Scale: 1:96 scale (1/8″ = 1 ft)
Type of Model: modified kit with solid hull
Build Time: 150 hrs

Build Materials:
The solid hull and copper plates are kit supplied. The deck was planked with boxwood strips, the deck houses and other fittings were scratch built using boxwood. The bowsprit, masts, and yards will be fabricated out of boxwood.

Ship’s Story:
Built in Boston, Massachusetts in 1868, the Pilot Boat “Phantom” was operated out of Sandy Hook as New York Pilot Boat No. 11. On March 14, 1886, Phantom was the first ship to offer support to, and rescued 852 passengers of the sinking British liner S. S. Oregon off the coast of Long Island. Two years later, she went ashore during the Great Blizzard of March, 1888 resulting in the total loss of the vessel and six crew members.

Modeler’s Bio:
I picked up wooden ship modeling during the transition from my time in the U.S. Air Force to my current status as a Mechanical Engineering student at Colorado State University.. Additionally, I love to tinker and solve fabrication problems, so wooden model ship building and engineering were both natural fits for me. I am excited to participate in the Rocky Mountain Ship Wrights and look forward to learning all that I can from the experience of its members.

Oliver Cromwell

Scratch-built Admiralty model of the privateer, Oliver Cromwell, by Terry Godwin

Scratch-built Admiralty model of the privateer, Oliver Cromwell, by Terry Godwin

Modeler’s Name: Terry Godwin
Period: Revolutionary War
Scale: ¼”=1”
Type of Model: Scratch build – plank on frame
Build Time: Six years

Build Materials:
Built using Harold Hahn plans and method of construction. The model is built in the Admiralty style. Completely scratch built. Woods used are boxwood, ebony, pear, holly, and apple. The model is approximately 85% complete. I have no intention of rigging the model.

Ship’s Story:
The Oliver Cromwell was a 24-gun privateer. She had previously been a merchant ship but in late 1776, at Philadelphia, was rechristened to help in the colonial cause. She carried a crew of 150 and may have had as her original name Juno. The Oliver Cromwell’s short, but lucrative privateering career only lasted 3 months. She was captured by HMS Beaver and rechristened Beaver’s Prize.

Modeler’s Bio: Former Navy Officer

Navis Lusoria – Roman Troop Ship

John McGann is building this model of a Roman troop ship, Navis Lusoria, from scratch

John McGann is building this model of a Roman troop ship, Navis Lusoria, from scratch

Modeler’s Name: John R. McGann
Period: circa 300 AD
Scale: 3/8”=1”
Type of Model: Scratch built
Build Time: 200 so far

Build Materials:
The Model is entirely scratch built and under construction using beech wood to replicate oak. The photograph is of a full sized reproduction of a “Navis Lusoria” displayed in the Mainz Museum

Ship’s Story:
The Navis Lusoria (Dancing Ship) was a riverine troop ship that was used by the Roman Legions to patrol the Northern Border of the Empire. The Rhine, Moselle, Main, and Danube marked this Northern Boundary. In 1981 during the excavation for an extension of the Hilton Hotel at Mainz, Germany the remains of five of the vessels were discovered. The wrecks have been salvaged and are displayed at The Museum of Antique Shipping, Mainz.

Modeler’s Bio:
Retired commercial construction general superintendent. First ship model completed 1944

Lizzie Metzner – Great Lakes Schooner

A scratch-built model of the Great Lakes schooner, Lizzie Metzner by Ralph Buckwalter

A scratch-built model of the Great Lakes schooner, Lizzie Metzner by Ralph Buckwalter

Modeler’s Name: Ralph Buckwalter
Period: 1888
Scale: 7/64 in. per ft.
Type of Model: scratch built solid hull
Build Time: not estimated

Build Materials:
No plans were available for this ship. Based on the plans for a similar ship which was 46 ft longer than the Lizzie I reduced the plans so the overall length was equivalent to the 81 ft of the Luzzie. I built the hull based on these plans modifying the hull based on the photos I had of the Lizzie. . The hull was done using the bread and butter method which consists of multiple thin lifts of wood cut to lines taken from the plans . I was intrigued by the triangular sail on the fore mast. I sewed all of the sails and bent them on as shown in the photos.

Ship’s Story:
The Lizzie Metzner was a typical Great Lakes Schooner which was used to carry various cargos on the great lakes. She was built in 1888 Rand and Burger in Manitowoc Wisc. for the firm of Mashek and Metzner of Kewaunee Wisc., who owned the south pier in Manitowoc. Wisc. The Lizzie Metzner was 81 ft. in length, had a beam of 21ft 8 in. and a depth of 6ft 9 in. Her gross tonnage was 77. She was built from blue oak and cost $1200 when delivered. The Lizzie Mitzner had a shallow draft,less than 3 ft.,and had a centerboard that could be used to take advantage of this shallow draft. She had a Raffee sail, a triangular top sail, on the foremast. These Raffee sails were the trademark of many Great Lake schooners.

Modeler’s Bio:
Ralph Buckwalter, a retired Mechanical Engineer has been modeling for about 14 years. He joined the Rocky Mountain Shipwrights in 2000. His first model was a pirate ship.

Le Hussard

A kit of the Le Hussard was modified and constructed by Ralph Buckwalter

A kit of the Le Hussard was modified and constructed by Ralph Buckwalter

Modeler’s Name: Ralph Buckwalter
Period: 1845
Scale: ¼” = 1’
Type of Model: modified plank on bulkhead kit
Build Time: not estimated

Build Materials:
Build Materials: This model was built from an Artesania Latina kit that has been modified to more closely represent the description listed in the “Global Schooner”. I also used some information from “Souvenirs De Marine” by Admiral Paris which had better details than those of the kit. This included rigging and deck furniture. All sails were hand machine sewn and not the ones supplied with the kit. I also used a product named “Quicken” to stiffen and shape the sails.

Ship’s Story:
Le Hussard is identified as a French Brigantine built in 1845 in the kit, although she is described in the “Global Schooner” by Karl Heinz as a French Schooner. She was larger than her American and British counterparts. She has the following measurements: L – 98’ 6”, W – 27’ 11”, Depth in hold 9’ 2”. Her main feature was her armament. She carried two rotating carronades, 18 pounders, one in the bow and one in the stern. These rotating carronades were supposed to make Le Hussard a foe to fear but I don’t think this was the case. The bow panels would drop down so the carronade could be aimed at vessels low in the water close to the ship.

Modeler’s Bio:
Ralph Buckwalter, a retired Mechanical Engineer has been modeling for about 14 years. He joined the Rocky Mountain Shipwrights in 2000. His first model was a pirate ship, Black Falcon

MAS Italian Torpedo Boat

This Italian Torpedo Boat is a plastic model by Wayne Cassell

This Italian Torpedo Boat is a plastic model by Wayne Cassell

Modeler’s Name: Wayne Cassell
Period: WW II
Scale: 1:35
Type of model:
A modified plastic kit.

Build Materials:
Pre-formed plastic components.The 20mm ammo can racks are scratchbuilt from styrene and the antenna is model railroad E-Z Line. The crew is an additional kit.

Ship’s Story:
Motoscafo Armato Silurante (Italian: “Torpedo Armed Motorboat”), commonly abbreviated as MAS was a class of fast torpedo armed vessel used by the Regia Marina (Italian Royal Navy) during World War II.MAS boats served in the Mediterranean Sea primarily but some boats were deployed to the Black Sea and Lake Lagoda near Leningrad.

Modeler’s Bio:
Wayne demonstrates that great care and much experience can turn out award-winning models of plastic. He edited the Shipwright’s Scuttlebutt newsletter for over eight years.

 

Harvey – Baltimore Clipper

This Baltimore Clipper from a kit named Harvey is being modified and built by Martin Jelsema

This Baltimore Clipper from a kit named Harvey is being modified and built by Martin Jelsema

Modeler’s Name: Martin Jelsema
Period: Early 19th Century
Scale: 1:50
Type of Model: Modified kit – plank on frame
Build Time: 250 hrs so far

Build Materials:
This modified plank on bulkhead kit by Artisania Latina contains several wood types and will be complemented by brass and rigging cord of various sizes. Cherry wood was substituted for the walnut strips provided by the manufacturer. The entire deck layout will adhere to actual ship plans instead of the inaccurate deck plan supplied.

Ship’s Story:
There was no ship named Harvey from the time or the design of this model. Therefore, much research from several books will make it an authentic Baltimore Clipper fitted as a privateer in service of the U.S. during the War of 1812. The ship will be rigged as a topsail schooner.

Modeler’s Bio:
This is Martin Jelsema’s fourth build since “retiring” as a marketing consultant four years ago. As a teenager he built the wooden schooner model of the Bluenose. He collected tools for the next 50 years in anticipation of renewing the hobby while persuing a career in advertising and market consulting.

Greek Gallot

Greek Gallot build from a kit by Erik Collett

Greek Gallot build from a kit by Erik Collett

Modeler’s Name: Erik Collette
Period: Many centuries
Scale: 1:65
Type of Model: Built from kit
Build Time: not estimated.

Build Materials:
The model is based on a nineteen century engraving of the gallon. The model is built from an Amati kit.The materials used include walnut, baltic birch plywood, beechwood and brass.

Ship’s Story:
The Galiots have been used in the Mediterranean sea for centuries. They were also used in the Northern Europe of a while.They were instrumental in the Greek victory at the naval battle at Navarino during the 1821 – 1827 Greek independence war

Modeler’s Bio:
Erik has been a member of the Rocky Mountain Shipwrights since he was bitten by the modeling bug after visiting the RMS show in 2003. He completed his first model in 2004. Erik hails from Norway, where he was around boats during most of his youth. He attended the Norwegian Naval Academy and sailed on a merchant ship for a year. He came to the USA in 1962, and earned his BSCE and MBA degrees from the University of Denver. He is currently semi-retired as an engineering consultant.

Cutty Sark – Clipper Ship

Cutty Sark, a clipper ship model under construction by Mark Persichetti

Cutty Sark, a clipper ship model under construction by Mark Persichetti

Modeler’s Name: Mark Persichetti
Period: 19th Century
Scale: 1:72
Type of Model: plank on bulkhead from kit

Build Materials:
It’s a “plank-on-bulkhead” model. A series of vertical bulkheads (stations) were attached to a central keel. Then a layer of narrow hardwood planks were attached to the edges of the bulkheads, and sheets of veneer with a pre-printed pattern of deck planks were secured to the top edges of the bulkheads. You can see the bulkheads through the deck hatchways. Other components of the ship kit are displayed here too

Ship’s Story:
The Clipper Ship Cutty Sark was built in Scotland in 1869 for John ‘Jock’ Willis Shipping Line, London. Her figurehead depicts the witch Nannie Dee in Robert Burns’ poem, Tam O’Shanter, and she’s named after Nan’s short nightshirt – a ‘cutty sark’. She was designed for the tea trade between the UK and the Far East, but the opening of the Suez Canal in 1869 limited her years of service in that trade. Within a few years, she was engaged in the wool trade between the UK and Australia, and for other cargoes for which speed of delivery wasn’t so critical. It came under the possession of the Cutty Sark Preservation Society in 1953 as a museum ship open to the public at Greenwich GB, as a last example of a tea clipper.

Modeler’s Bio:
Mark has been making models since the 1950s. His first sailing-ship model was a smaller-scale Old Ironsides kit by Revell. Ships have been his favorite modeling subject since then. He has been a member of Rocky Mountain Shipwrights for over ten years.

CSS Alabama

CSS Alabama

Martin Jelsema modified the CSS Alabama from the Mamoli kit

Modeler’s Name: Martin Jelsema

Period: Civil War
Scale: 1:120
Type of Model: Modified kit – plank on frame
Build Time: 700hrs

Build Materials:
This Model is a modified plank on bulkhead Mamoli kit build. Both deck configuration and rigging deviated from the Mamoli plans to follow the details illustrated in the book by Andrew Bowcock, Anatomy of a Confederate Raider. Hull is double planked in basswood and walnut. The “hammocks” on the rails are Q-tips. Completed with wood, cord and metal fittings.

Ship’s Story:
The CSS Alabama was Confederate raider whose mission was to interrupt Union merchant trade during the Civil War. During it’s two years of raiding it captured 63 American merchant ships and one War Ship. It was in port at Cherbourg, France when “called out” by the USS Kearsarge. It was sunk by the Kearsarge. It was discovered by divers and is being raised little by little by the French.

Modeler’s Bio:
This is Martin Jelsema’s third build since “retiring” as a marketing consultant four years ago. As a teenager he built the wooden schooner model of the Bluenose. He collected tools for the next 50 years in anticipation of renewing the hobby while persuing a career in advertising and market consulting.

Christopher Columbus

Scratch built model of the 1900-1934 Great Lakes excursion boat by John McGann

Scratch built model of the 1900-1934 Great Lakes excursion boat by John McGann

Modeler’s Name: John R. McGann

Period: 1883-1933
Scale: 3/32″ = 1′
Type of Model: scratch build from original plans
Build Time: 500 hrs.

Build Materials:
Scratch built from original plans of wood, styrene, and paper.

Ship’s Story:
The only passenger ship built to the whaleback design. Built at West Superior, Wisconsin in eighty one days. She served as an excursion liner on the Great Lakes from 1883 until 1933. Scrapped at Manitowoc, Wisconsin 1936. Length 363′ Beam 42′ Tonnage 1,511 tons. Carried more passengers than any other vessels on the Great Lakes.

Modeler’s Bio:
Retired construction supt. Model builder for 75 years

Bounty in a Bottle

Scratch-built Bounty in a Bottle - put there by Daniel Siemens

Scratch-built Bounty in a Bottle – put there by Daniel Siemens

Modeler’s Name: Daniel Siemens
Period: early 1800’s
Scale: 1:1000
Type of Model: scratch build ship in bottle
Build Time: 10 hours

Build Materials:
Match sticks, basswood and bamboo

Ship’s Story:
This ship is modeled after the ship built for the 1960 film The Bounty. It was later used in films such as the 1989 Treasure Island, Pirates of the Caribbean, Dead Mans Chest and At Worlds End. The ship sunk in Hurricane Sandy with the loss of the Captain and one crew member. This was one of many commemorative builds built by members of the Ship in Bottle Association of America. The other builds can be seen on www.folkartinbottles.com.

Modeler’s Bio:
I do accounting as my day job but love bottling ships when I can find time. I started two years ago after watching the fourth Pirates of the Caribbean movie.