Oseberg Viking Ship

Model from a kit of the famed Oseberg Viking Ship by Erik Collett

Model from a kit of the famed Oseberg Viking Ship by Erik Collett

Modeler’s Name: Erik Collette
Period: 815 AD
Scale: 1:50
Type of Model: Kit built
Build Time: 150 hrs.

Build Materials:
Birch plywood, pine and basswood

Ship’s Story:
This ship was a Norwegian Viking ship built in approximately 815 AD. It was used as a burial ship in 834. It was discovered in a burial mound on the Oseberg Farm in Norway in 1904. It has been restored and can be seen today at the Viking ship museum in Oslo. It is 71 feet long with a beam of 15 feet. The construction was unique in that it was klinker built with iron nails and then the planks were tied to the ribs. The mast was approximately 35-40 feet tall. Homespun wool, woven into squares, was used for the sail. The squares were sewn together and the sail was reinforced with strips of leather. There were 15 oar holes on each side. The rudder was an enlarged oar fitted on the aft starboard side. In 2011, a full-scale copy was built to evaluate the design and test the ship’s seaworthiness. The ship is docked in Tonsberg.

Modeler’s Bio:
Erik has been a member of the Rocky Mountain Shipwrights since he was bitten by the modeling bug after visiting the RMS show in 2003. He completed his first model in 2004. Erik hails from Norway, where he was around boats during most of his youth. He attended the Norwegian Naval Academy and sailed on a merchant ship for a year. He came to the USA in 1962, and earned his BSCE and MBA degrees from the University of Denver. He is currently semi-retired.

Oseberg skipet

Oseberg skipet - Eric Collett

Erik Collett spent 150 hours building this Norwegian Viking Ship model.
The hull is built from oak planks, glued together and then glued to the
ribs. The wood was then sealed with flat varnish. The sail is cotton.

The original ship was built in 815AD and was used as a burial ship after 20 years of icoastal trading. It was discovered on an Oseberg, Norway farm in 1904. It has been restored and can be seen today at the Viking Ship Museum in Oslo. The ship was 71 feet long, 17 feet wide. The mast was 40 feet tall and carried a 30feet wide, 15 feet long sail. Square homespun wool was used for the sail. The squares were sewn together with strips of leather. There are 15 oar holes on each side. The rudder was an enlarged oar fitted on the aft starboard side.

Period: 815-834, now restored           Model length: 17”, height 10”             Scale:1:50

Oseberg Viking Ship

Oseberg modeled by Bob Conover

Bob Conover built this model, one of two Osebergs entered in this year's show.

Bob Conover built this modified kit. He exposed the section between frames just forward of the mast to show the construction details used by 9th-century Vikings. Note the way planks were secured to the ribs by means of lashings through holes in the undersides of the ribs, and corresponding holes in cleats cut in the strakes located next to the ribs.

The original Oseberg was excavated from a grave in 1904 and is on display in the Nautical Museum of Oslo, Norway. This ship had 12 strakes secured with rivets in lapstrake hull construction. In later Viking ships the lashing method was replaced with wood dowels.

Period: Around 800ad
Model is 23” long, 16”tall
Scale:  1:50