Carrack

Name of Model:  Spanish Carrack
Period ship sailed:  1490s
Type of Model: Plastic kit

Modeler’s Name:  Mark Persichetti
Scale of model:  3/32″ =1″
Build Time:  NA

Description of build, including materials:   All the smooth-plastic surfaces were sanded with coarse-grit paper, to give them a wood-grain appearance.  I added extra details to the kit’s interior spaces, such as gun carriages, bunks, and tiller with dampening tackle – much of which can’t be seen now!  I hand-made cloth sails with hand-sewn bolt ropes.  The model’s Mediterranean-style rigging blocks were from Heller (France) plastic kits.

Ship’s Story:  Carracks were large cargo-carrying vessels, with a broad beam (width) compared to its length, and rather deep draft (depth in the water).  Carracks generally had a continuous main deck, unbroken by full-width bulwarks (walls).  The large area under the main deck was used to carry as much cargo as possible.  Carracks generally had a raised deck aft of the main mast, which provided some shelter over the main deck, and might also have a raised forecastle deck and a separate Captain’s/Master’s cabin aft.

This particular model is based on a reproduction of the Santa Maria, built to plans done by researcher Julio F Guillen in Spain in 1929.  The ship, currently on display in Barcelona, was rebuilt in 1951.

Modeler’s Bio:  I have been making models since the 1950s.  My first sailing-ship model was a smaller-scale Old Ironsides kit by Revell.  Ships have been my favorite modeling subject since

Venetian Galleass

Name of Model: Venetian Galleass
Period: 1530-1600
Scale: 1:150

Modeler’s Name: Mark Persichetti
Type of Model: plastic kit highly modified
Build Time: not estimated

Build Materials: This model is built from a kit produced by the Imai Company of Japan about 40 years ago.  That kit, while depicting a unique old sail- and oar-driven wooden warship, is made up of molded-plastic parts. All the smooth-plastic surfaces were sanded with coarse-grit paper, to give them a wood-grain appearance. Sails are vacuum-formed thin plastic, sanded in two directions to give them a woven-fabric appearance.

Ship’s Story: The Galleass type was an expansion of the typical Mediterranean rowed galley, which were long and narrow, propelled by oars in poor wind conditions, and by triangular-shaped ‘lateen’ sails in good winds.

Galleys typically featured battering-ram extensions at their bow, just above the waterline. At the Battle of Lepanto in October 1571, the combined Christian fleets under command of Don Juan of Austria fought against the Turkish fleet commanded by Muezzenade Ali Pasha.  The loss of men on both sides was almost equal, but Turkish ship losses were close to 17-to-1 compared to the Christian fleets.  Modeler’s Bio: Mark has been making models since the 1950s.  His first sailing-ship model was a smaller-scale Old Ironsides kit by Revell.  Ships have been his favorite modeling subject since then. He has been a member of Rocky Mountain Shipwrights for over ten years.